Results for Queensland Ambulance Service


EEG in TRaumatic brAin INjury (EnTRAIN)

Head injury results in a high degree of ongoing disability. Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is higher in the 15-19 and 75+ age groups with older Australians having a three times greater incidence compared to the general population (Pozzato, Tate, Rosenkoetter, & Cameron, 2019).

There are two distinct aspects to a severe head injury - the primary injury and the secondary injury that occurs as a result of deranged brain functioning. Treatments are targeted at minimising the damage occurring during the secondary stage and to protect damaged brain tissue by optimising blood flow, oxygen delivery and reducing the metabolic needs of the brain.

There is currently no way to closely monitor the 'real-time' physiologic changes beyond clinical symptoms such as changes in pupil size, heart rate, blood pressure etc. and, in the case of rising pressure in the brain, treatment is initiated on clinical suspicion alone. Electroencephalograms (brain wave monitors) have shown promise in their ability to detect brain oxygen starvation, seizure presence and increased pressure in the brain.

This pilot of Quantitative EEG (qEEG) will measure these changes during prehospital care of TBI, the results of this research would be used to guide larger studies into the use of this technology.

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Clinician decision making in peripheral intravenous cannulation in emergency settings

Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) is a vital part of modern medicine, however the use of cannulas has become prolific, with many never used. The patient risks that are associated with PIVC are well documented, including pain and even infections, which can be severe and lead to death.

PIVCs which are inserted but never used (idle PIVC), have risks and downsides, but no potential benefits. Reducing the rate of idle PIVC may reduce the overall rate of risks, side-effects and infections associated with PIVC, but may also lead to patients who require PIVC not receiving one.

This study will look into the reasons why clinicians decide to insert a PIVC. Researchers aim to describe: I) the proportion of PIVCs placed that do not get used within 24 hours (idle PIVCs), II) differences between the pre-hospital setting and the emergency department and III) the factors associated with clinicians’ decision making regarding PIVC insertion.

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Improving jellyfish sting treatment

EMF funding is improving emergency care for the elderly

Trauma: better treatment for severe bleeding

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